Dry Erase Crayons…A Review

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One of the supplies we use most often in our studies are Dry-Erase markers.   I adore our large dry erase boards and have found my favorite brand of Dry-Erase marker.  The problem is that the little learners also do dry-erase activities.  The little ones use laminated pages from Confessions of a Homeschoolers LOTW, draw on the big boards and various other activities on dry erase boards and books. It never fails, the minute I turn my back one of them is drawing on themselves, the tables or each other. I went to Joann Fabric in search of Washable Dry Erase markers, that’s when I came across these lovely Dry-Erase crayons. I bought a package of each brand, Crayola and Leap Frog,  to see how they worked and decided I would share my results with you.

If you shop much at Joann Fabrics you must know that if you download the Joann app, you almost always have coupons of 40-50% off available ( read…never pay full price at Joann’s! No smart phone? Sign up for their flyer.  Better yet..do both! ) If you are an educator, homeschool or otherwise, you can sign up for an Educator discount card. (Be prepared to show proof..just thought you might like to know.)  Moving along.

The Crayola Washable Dry-Erase Crayons come in regular or Bright colors. They range in price from $3.00-$6.00 for 8 crayons depending where you purchase them.

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The LeapFrog Jumbo Washable Dry-Erase Crayons seem to be priced a touch higher in the $4.00-7.00 range for the same 8 crayon box.  They were also a little more difficult to locate locally. The Crayola Crayons are readily available at most craft, office supply and big box stores.

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I allowed the kids and their friends to use the crayons for a week to see how they worked.  Here is what I liked about the crayons.

Both  the Leap Frog and Crayola Crayons are approximately the same size.  They are a bit larger than regular crayons making them easier for the toddler and preschoolers smaller hands. 

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Both brands wrote smoothly with ease and with good coverage.  If I had to choose I would say the Leap Frog Crayons were a bit smoother, but not substantially. 

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Both brands of crayons erased well.  In the sample above I used the reds and pinks as these tend to leave the most residue when erased. The Crayola Bright left the most residue but again, not a ton and it was easily removed with a bit of extra wiping on my part.   As a bonus, the packages of Crayola  crayons came with a cloth for erasing.

Both Crayola and Leap Frog brands had built-in sharpeners on the boxes which is nice.  We typically keep crayons in plastic boxes or buckets and toss boxes, so not a huge deal for us.  I would say both crayons kept their points equally well, which is not long when in the hands of little learners. 

All of the crayons were in fact washable as they claimed.  The crayons washed easily off of  hands and arms, clothing and solid surfaces.

Here is what I didn’t like about these crayons. 

These crayons are very soft. As soon as the crayons begin to warm up, they break quite easily.  When I say “warm up”  I am talking about warming up in the fist of the three-year-old after a few minutes of use.  This was not as big of a problem with the 5-year-old, but she holds her crayons differently and has  learned to control the pressure she applies better than her younger sibling.  Both the Crayola crayons and the Leap Frog crayons had this problem.  I would say the Leap Frog crayons were quite a bit better though.  I am pretty sure if you left these crayons in a moderately warm car or even laying out in the sun on the porch on a warm day…they would be toast!

Having said that, I really do like these crayons and will continue purchasing them for the under 6 crowd in our home.  I prefer the Leap Frog crayons and as long as I can get them locally (especially at Joanns for 50% off) I will buy them.

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